Don’t fall foul of Multi-chip Modules

Don't fall foul of Multi-chip Modules

Don’t fall foul of Multi-chip Modules

We are finding that many Oracle users are being caught out by the new architecture of the AMD 6100 and upward series processors, mounted in G34 sockets. Inside these processors there can be two processor chips. This means that if you are using Oracle Database Standard Edition, Standard Edition One or Standard Edition 2, then Oracle counts each processor as two sockets not one.

So, if you are using Standard Edition One or Standard Edition 2 and you think you have a 2-socket server and think you are complying with Oracle’s limits you may be mistaken. Oracle will see this now as a 4-socket server. This is OK if you are still on the old versions of the Database before 12.0.1.2 and you have Standard Edition licences.

However, if you are using Standard Edition One or Standard Edition 2, you would no longer be OK and would potentially need to move to Enterprise Edition, which would be a costly move!

The latest AMD Epyc SOC (System-on-chip) processors, such as the 7000 series, can contain up to 4 chips on the multi-socket motherboard contained within the processor casing. In the case of 4 chips, Oracle would count it as four sockets which would mean that it would not be permitted to host Oracle Database Standard Edition One or Standard Edition 2.

Here is the wording from Oracle's database licensing document.

“When licensing Oracle programs with Standard Edition One, Standard Edition 2 or Standard Edition in the product name, a processor is counted equivalent to a socket; however, in the case of multi-chip modules, each chip in the multi-chip module is counted as one occupied socket.”

Ask us for help if you are unsure of the licensing implications for your set up.

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